Job Opportunities

Full-Time Research Assistant + Lab Manager

Attention Brain & Cognition Lab, Department of Psychology, University of Hong Kong

A full-time research assistant + lab manager position is available in the Attention Brain & Cognition Lab led by Dr. Janet Hsiao in the Department of Psychology, University of Hong Kong. The research assistant will assist in developing eye tracking and behavioral experiments, preparing stimuli, collecting data, and performing basic data analysis on a project related to eye movements and face processing. Experience in conducting eye tracking experiments or in working with children is preferred but not required. Depending on the interest, the research assistant may also assist in advanced data analysis using Eye Movement analysis with Hidden Markov Models (EMHMM; http://abc.psy.hku.hk/emhmm). There are also opportunities to participate in projects related to current research in the lab including EEG and computational modeling. In addition, the research assistant will be in charge of lab management work, including scheduling meetings etc.

Requirements: A Bachelor’s degree in Psychology, Cognitive Science, or related fields. Experience in conducting psychological experiments. Good communication skills. Good computer skills.

The position is available from June 30, 2021 for one year (negotiable). Review of the applications will start on May 14, 2021 and will continue until the position is filled.

To know more about the research in the lab, please see our publications here: http://web.hku.hk/~jhsiao/pubs/

Interested candidates should send a CV including academic qualifications and experience, a copy of transcripts, a cover letter describing interests in this position, and names and contact information of two referees, to: Dr. Janet Hsiao, jhsiao at hku dot hk, with the subject line “Full-Time Research Assistant”. For more information, please contact Dr. Janet Hsiao.

We are looking for volunteer research assistants to work in the Sleep, Self-regulation, and Health lab (www.psychology.hku.hk/slashlab). We conduct experimental and intervention studies in the area of sleep, eating, and health conditions. Applicants who are interested in the following projects are strongly recommended to apply.

Development of Digital Cognitive and Behavioral Interventions

  1. This project aims to develop and evaluate the efficacy of digital cognitive and behavioral interventions for various conditions including insomnia, depression, and chronic illness management. Applicants will be responsible for helping with the design, coding, scripting of the digital intervention.
  2. Applicants should be interested in app development and have relevant experience and skills, or be very eager to learn. Skills in graphic design, UI & UX and video production are appreciated.

Understanding the associative learning mechanisms in individuals with eating disorder symptoms/binge-eating

  1. This project aims to investigate how sleep deprivation impacts learning mechanisms related to eating. Those interested in lab experimental studies and eating disorder related clinical problems are encouraged to apply.​

An ideal applicant will have strong academic competence and work ethic, good organization and communication skills, and preferable some experience working in a lab. Most importantly you should be eager to learn and take initiatives. Highly motivated and capable individuals will have the opportunity to contribute to data analysis and manuscript writing and earn authorship credits. Students can enroll in credit-bearing research internship courses, PSYC2072 and PSYC2073.  This position may also lead to paid opportunities in the future.

If you are interested, please email Dr. Wai Sze Chan (slashlab@hku.hk) with your CV and academic transcript.

Recruiting outstanding staff to promote excellence in teaching and learning, research, and knowledge exchange is one of The University of Hong Kong’s top priorities. To find out more about working with us and also what it’s like to live in Hong Kong, visit the website “Professors from Afar”.

HKU Psychology